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20120901
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the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance this is not existing right now. but if you mean by ally, partner and special diplomatic relationship and cooperation we are that ally. >> rose: president morsi for the hour. next. >> tonight a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: mohamed morsi won an historic election this june to become the fifth president of egypt. he is the first civilian to hold this title. two years ago it would have been
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to w but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. including
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> a throughou these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internal among the ung pele and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief in beirut
to the united states. >> i think the componts, the resolution of the iranian crisis there has to be negotiation, there has to be sanctions, there has to be a credible threat of war and there has to be a ladder to enable the regime to climb down. if you have all four elements in play then you can have a peaceful resolution to all of these. but if you look at it, i'm not happy, i should say this very clearly. i'm not happy with the way our foreign policy and doe midwest i can politics have become intertwined. i'm not happy at the rift between the prime minister and the administration. when he said we need to see red lines, secretary clinton said there are not going to be red lines. >> rose: we conclude with best selling author michael lewis talking about a new article he has in "vanity fair" about president obama. >> i thought what would be a fun piece of journalism to do? and i just had been struck through the course not just of this man's administration, this president's administration but previous ones just kind of a dysjuncture between the commentary on the outside and what it kind of seemed
. the impasse is just one of the many strains on relations between russia and the united states. iran is another is the dis trust over nato's defense shield. earlier this month the u.s. agency of the international development to lead russia. i'm pleased to have sergey lavrov back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much, nice to be back. >> rose: u.s.-russia relations. >> yes, i believe we agree that these relations should be promoted. when president obama came to the whitehouse, he and his team assessed the relationship between moscow and washington and suggested what they call the reset of those relations which we supported. and i believe that since then, we have been having understanding between us, between moscow and russia, that the really mutually beneficial partnership in the interest of the russian and american people in the interest of international relations given the importance of the two countries can be based on equal, mutually respectful, mually beneficial relatiohip. and on that route, we achieved quite a lot. i would be incomplete if i don't mention that there are problems
against the united states without some consequencesment now that authority has been removed. the imams and other speakers at fridayrayers are fee to s almt whatever they want. and that makes the situation far more dangerous. >> protests and deaths in the middle east. and political implications in america when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. in this presidential election of 2012 foreign policy was not considered to be an important ctor. that all chandnow because on monday night when american diplomatic interests came under attack in egypt and libya, tragically ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in benghazi, governor romney has attempted to make some political attacks out of the situation. and here is what he said. >> i think it's a-- a -- -- a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> rose: president obama responded in kind in a conversation
with a film made in the u.s. that ridicules the prophet mohammad. >> i have made it clear the united states had nothing to do with this video. it is an insult to muslims but america as well, that i have witnessed after nearly four years as president. i remain ever hopeful all right world that we live in. the war in iraq is over. american troops have come home. al qaeda's been weakened. and osama bin laden is no more. >> obama took the podium six weeks before the u.s. presidential election. he spent much of his time defending his record on foreign policy. >>> to coincide with the open egg ofhe general asell blame, british charity has released a video report on children in syria who are suffering from the escalating violence. many syrian children are haunted by the memory of seeing family members killed in front of their eyes. they have observed children becoming overaggressive. some have injured themselves due to severe psychological wounds. they say a school in the syrian capital, damascus, was bombed on tuesday and children's lives are at risk. the video report shows children sheltering in
, to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. ( cheers and applause ) >> thank you! >> ifill: that was followed by saxophonist branford marsalis performing the national anthem. ray suarez is on the floor now among the delegates, where he's been each night this week. >> suarez: you know, gwen, one of the biggest events of this week is something that isn'tingt going to happen, the long-expected and long-planned-for stadium welcome for president obama tomorrow night where he would give his acceptance speech. because of threatening skies, that has been canceled and moved indoors to the arena where the rest of the convention has been held. well, it means some inconvenience for the people who were set to appear there. it means some inconvenience for the people who were staging the event, but the real problem is with the tens of thousands of people who gave tens of thousands of volunteer hours in order to qualify for a ticket to see the president accept the nomination of his party for anot
's got the uwe united states out of iraq. the united states after going up has now come down to some extent in afghanistan. he mdleast,ven though it's turbulent, is more open than it was. so i think the president in general can point to some areas where he moved forward and some areas obviously his critics will say where he movedded back. all in all it's a defense i believe and defendable record. >> ifill: i want to walk through some of that piece by piece. referencing the president's speech today, he turned over a big chunk of it to talking about the difference between railing against or speaking out against violence... violent extremism versus protecting free speech. why was so much devoted to that topic? >> gwen, i thought it was an interesting speech. very reflective speech. i think probably designd by the president and his advisors to try to heal some of the wounds that have been so apparent between the muslim world and the united states over these last two weeks, these very tragic weeks. i thought it was interesting the way he framed the issue. he clearly disassociated the unit
afghanistan will talk with the united states about ending the occupation of afghanistan. it is not in the power of the kabul administration. >> reporter: taliban members decided in march this year to suspend their talks with u.s. negotiators. >> translator: from different channels in direct approaches were there, but they were not fruitful. so we suspended the talks from our side. confidence-building measures must be taken to end fighting. i've already said that this war has been imposed on us. >> cease-fire can be a part of the package of negotiation. we can't breach that. it means if they decide not to talk about afghanistan that they are returning to the military approach. the islamic community will have no option exct to follow the same option to resisting in order to gain the theater. >> reporter: u.s. and taliban negotiators seem to be making progress on finally ending afghanistan's long war. with now the taliban says it's up to the u.s. side to get the talks going again. nhk world. >>> a complete transcript of the interview with taliban negotiators can be found on
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize rhis columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rate short trem interest rates are already essentily at zero, the fed mov
. >> the united states as a matter of policy does not take position with regards to competing sovereignty claims. it's important that diplomatic means on both sides be used to try to constructively resolve these issues. >> japanese business people in china have looked out of their pla plants. they don't like what they see. what's t view from the facto factori factories. >> some are seeing protesters and they are pulling down their shutters as protesters turn nasty in china japanese are closing down their factories and stores. honda motor will stop operations at five plants. they say it will be hard to ship products amid possible violence. another carmaker plans to shut down its factory for four days from tuesday. electronics firms panasonic is halting work. retailers are taking similar precautious. the super market chain will keep a store closed for the time being. executives decided to keep their three department stores closed for some time. ito and 7-eleven are playing it safe. they are shutting some of their outlets on tuesday. japanese business leaders have cancelled a tour to china. they pl
in lowering the abortion rates in the united states. >> steven snack is co-chair of catholics for obama. he asserts that the proposed republican budget cuts will lead to more abortions. >> thinking about that, i -- i have to say, you know, i'm morally challenged to think about supporting romney/ryan as a pro-life voter. >> on the jewish front there was outrage after the democratic platform eliminated a previous provision asserting that jerusalem is and will remain the capital of israel. that provision was later reinserted, along with the mention of god. republican jewish activists have been arguing president obama is vulnerable among jewish voters because of his policy onisrael. but leaders here said it's strong to stereotype jewish views. jeremy is the president of "j-street." >> there's a wide range of views when it comes to israel. turns out the majority are moderate in their views and not as hawkish and militant as the loudest voices that are heard. >> he's confident jews will vote for obama in high numbers in november. >> that vote is not up for grabs in any significant way, certainly
for gremine, did you ever dream that you'd be working with poor people in the united states of america? >> no. i think the world's biggest, richest country of the world. and the formula we developed that is the poorest country of the world. >> the united states is a country that everyone thinks has money, doesn't have any poor people. we have more than 45 million people living in poverty in the united states. >> and he says it takes much more than financing to help them break out of it. business counselling, keeping the books, paying bills, even opening savings accounts, which is required of borrowers. even that is often not enough. joe salvaggio, a former catholic priest who's worked for decades with poor people, says many who would be entrepreneurs fail because their finances are precarious. >> if they got sick or their kids got sick or the landlord, there was a storm and they got some physical damage or something. setbacks happen to people. so often they don't have one time to get a check to somebody, she put it in the bank and she had so many bank overdrafts that it ate up almost the whol
the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were nearly 400,000 more jobs created in the previous year that ended
in mexico and the united states. there was very little effort to interdict the weapons to stop them from going across the bordeand, of course, with the deh ofgentryan try and other deaths, we see what the consequences are. >> brown: so the key questions became-- of course, it became a political issue, who is responsible for this, how much were the white house and the attorney general's office involved? so what does the report tell us? >> well, the harshest criticism comes down for an official in the criminal division, his name is jason weinstein. he resigned yesterday under pressure. and essentially he is called out for repeatedly having access to docents, wirap apliction for instance, he had-- he read summaries of and perhaps didn't read all of it and didn't ask follow-up questions. the inspector general says that, you know, if he knew about an earlier operation called "wide receiver" in the bush administration. now, that was 2006 and 2007 and allowed about 400 firearms to be trafficked. and weinstein finds out about this in early 2009 and instead of making sure it didn't happen again,
balance of power. >> rose: nobody wants the united states to do that. >> no, i know that! that's why there's a it will bit of disingenuousness of people saying "what must we do?" a no-fly zone. okay, what happens when the syrians shoot at the no-fly zone. what happens when the russians get involved in it's a problem from hell. it'ser the to believe see what's going on. >> is there any answer in terms of somehow a group of countries getting together, neighbors and others, including iran even though that would be very difficult for everybody to come to some kind so soutns because they have the russians, iranians, americans. >> people would have... >>. >> rose: and arabs. >> and iraq. to the extent that it worked it worked because there was one power there. can you imagine a committee of the iranians, the russians, the chinese. and that's my dilemma with it. i don't know how it's going to end. i think this could burn on in different forms for a long time. charlie, step back, what are we seeing? we're seeing two huge political orders crumbling at once. one is called the european union where th
or police who are serving, who were not part of the taliban but who then turn against the united states? what about that? >> well, that in itself is worrisome. in other words, if the non-taliban afghan security forces are growing anti-american, that means that the line between taliban and afghan security forces can be actually gradually diminishing. also in the eyes of the population, sometimes the way we look at this very clinically that this many are taliban and this many are not may not b apparent to the afghan population who see that the afghan security forces are acting like the way the taliban would act. >> woodruff: this all started, john nagl, about this video, this anti-islam video came out. but is that playing a significant role in what we're now seeing? >> i don't think it's playing a significant role in the attacks we saw over the weekend. it is playing obviously a very significant role in the more broad islamic uprisings against american embassies including in pakistan. i continue to think that pakistan is the root of the problem and the country we should be most concerned
a lot of the same problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say, debt relief to greece, well, then you can be pretty sure that other european countries that also have received bailouts will want the same treatment. so what you're trying to do in europe, in minute, is really to-- i believe that ultimately debt relief will have-- further debt relief will have to be given to greece by the euro area governments. but they're really trying to make the road to that so arduous and so terrible that nobody else in europe will really want to go down that ute. an as we'r looking at greece today-- which has a cumulative decline in g.d.p. of, you know, close to 20% and still dro
it become a genuine crisis. it's also a reminder to the united states of why it is seen as important by many nations in asia that we stay as a balancing factor in the military relationship there >> warner: china doesn't like that >> they would prefer it to having japan arm itself. so everybody resents the u.s. presence but is more comforting than the most obvious alternative > waer: you have a prediction? >> i think it will calm down but the issues will be simmering for some time. all the territorial maritime issues that are taking place now are of a peace. the political process is still playing out in china. the leaders there want to contain the damage to themselves but they don't want to be so suppressing of popular opinion that they're seen as opposing popular will on the issue of sovereignty >> warner: or out of touch. doug paal and jim fall owes, thank you. >> woodruff: next, seeking peace in syria and around the globe. jeffrey brown talks to former u.n. secretary general kofi annan. >> brown: kofi annan's first career u.n. staffer to rise to head the organization has spent more than 4
by the united states. >> fundamentally we do not take seriously the threats of an attack on iran by them even though we are iran. iran at the end of the day is a great country. let me assure you we do have all defensive means at our disposal. >> prime minister netanyahu has said that israel simply cannot stand to have iran to get to the point where it has enough enriched uranium to be able to very quickly convert that to weapons grade and really essentially from a weaon in a matter of months. he's made it clear that israel is prepared to take military action to try to prevent that. do you think he's bluffing? >> you see, whether he's bluffing or he really intends that does not even come into the equation. for us. what are these scientists? put a world map in front of you. put an at last in front of you. iran has been iran for the last 7,000-10,000 years. they have been occupying those territories for the last 60 to 70 years with the support and force of the westerners. they have no roots there in history. >> ifill: i'm joined by margaret warner who is at the u.n. this afternoon. margaret, tha
condemnation has given a strong message that the united states government not only condemns it, but has absolutely no support for such blasphemous videos or content anywhere. i think that is an important message. i think that should go a long way in ending the violence on many streets in the world. >> brown: but in iran, at a military parade, president mahmoud ahmadinejad accused the u.s. and others of promoting strife under the guise of protecting civil liberties. >> ( translated ): they are seeking to trigger ethnic and religious conflicts. they chant fake slogans of freedom, and claim commitment to freedom of thought and freedom of speech. >> brown: and back in pakistan, prime minister raja pervez ashraf called for the world to outlaw blasphemy. >> we are demanding that the united nations and other international organizations seek a law that bans such hate speech aimed at fomenting hatred and sowing the seeds of discord through such falsehood. >> brown: in the meantime, pakistan shut down youtube access after the web site refused to remove the anti- islamic video. and in france, auth
a president of the united states. that's a people president. >> suarez: not all the people are happy. occupy protesters, joined by a big coalition of other pressure groups, took to the streets of charlotte, accompanied by a like number of police and reporters to bring their complaints to the convention about the president's lack of action on immigration, climate change, on bailing out the banks while millions lost their homes, since the president took office, william albritton says he's working harder for less money. >> i'm working at a warehouse now and i have a side job doing landscaping for a company, but i'm probably working 60 hours a week and i make right around $400 a week, before i was 40 hours a week and making $400. >> suarez: many of the protestors said there isn't much difference between democrats and republicans. they're skeptical of the president's links to wealthy donors and wall street. katherine fowler is still willing to give barack obama a chance. >> we have a message for the president. i support him, but i also want him to listen to me. we are concerned that the the middl
the united states? >> indeed, there is. the arctic sea ice essentially is a big reflector of solar energy during the summer and that keeps the arctic cooler than it normally would be. it acts like an air conditioner for the earth's climate system and that helps not only keep the arctic cooler but also the globe as well. and it's basically a safe for heed that comes in at the equator, gets transported to the north you lose the heat in the arctic. and that transfer of eat from the equator to the poles, that essentially helps set up things like the jet stream, prevailing winds, weather tracks. so as we start to lose the ice cover and warm up the arctic, essentially that's changing the balance between the kuwaitor and the poles and that will shift things like storm tracks and the jet stream and that will change weather patterns and we've seen some evidence of that already and we expect to see more in the future, although we're still in the early stages of understanding that completely. >> suarez: you know, it's a commonplace in stories written about what's happening in greenland, what's happe
, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a legal authorization. and up to now, three times, russia and china say no. and, therefore, up to now, we haven't been able to intervene. which is a humanitarian catastrophe. because every day you have more than 200 people killed. and because the security council doesn't say yes, we can't do anything. no, it's
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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